Simplest NLP Pattern

The Simplest NLP Pattern To Use

In the last newsletters nlp1.html  and nlp2.html we demonstrated why certain NLP techniques don’t work in print and the one thing you MUST do to get these patterns to explode your conversion rates. In nlp3.html we introduced the concept of criteria which we will expand upon. And in nlp4.html we began to explain how to elicit criteria.  Innlp5.html we introduced the concept of misdirection. In nlp6.html we began the concept of changing criteria. Innlp7.html we revealed the contest winner.

 It Doesn’t Get Any Easier Than This…

Some people have written to me and asked if there are any easier NLP patterns to use in your copy and I hasten to respond to your needs.

I’m about to share the simplest pattern with you and it’s so drop dead easy to you, it would be natural to question its effectiveness.

In fact, it calls into question a major principle of copy.  So stick with me for this and you’ll no doubt learn something.  In fact, this is the single pattern you can imediately use – even if you are a beginner – and you’ll thank me for it later.

Did you discover the pattern already?  What, Kilstein you’ve been doing something?

Yes, it’s called a connecting strategy.

Take two sentences and link them with the word “and”.

Is that all there is to it? No but don’t make this too hard.

Typically, the pattern runs like this: (using the example from above)

In fact, this is the single pattern you can immediately use – even if you are a beginner – and you’ll thank me for it later.

We start with two sentences.

In fact, this is the single pattern you can immediately use – even if you are a beginner.

You’ll thank me for it later.

Are those sentences related? Only in my devious mind.

Sentence A is a pace.  I am matching your experience.  You can immediately verify it.

Sentence B is a lead.  I am leading you in the direction I want.  You’ll thank me for it later.

Add It To Your Copy Now!

How can I use this in copy?  “Easy shmeezy” as my kids used to say.

How about these:

“Every morning as you look down at the scale, you feel the hurt of being overweight and you begin to wonder if there is a solution to this problem.”

“The next time you go to the ATM machine and find out how little money you have in the bank, you’re going to wish you took action on some of the ideas you’d had and you’ll be more open to moving ahead in your life.”

“You’ve been reading these messages on NLP and Copywriting and finally beginning to realize the power of using these patterns in print.”

Now Pay Attention, Buckwheat!

The Buckwheat was in memory of Gary Halbert.

Notice in the patterns I used, I went for a simple step.

“You’ve been reading these messages on NLP and Copywriting and finally beginning to realize the power of using these patterns in print.”

Notice I did not go for the kill in one step:

“You’ve been reading these messages on NLP and Copywriting and finally understand the importance of attending my NLP seminar in September.”

The reason you don’t do this is because it’s too much of a lead and not enough pacing of the experience.  Of course these patterns can get you what ever you want but only if you use them correctly.

The only copywriter who attempted to teach NLP in Print was Maria Veloso in her “Web Copy That Sells.”  In an upcoming newsletter, I’ll share – in a video – exactly what I think of her chapter on NLP and you’ll understand the drawbacks of using NLP incorrectly.

Simple Pattern – Mucho Power!

In my very next newsletter I’m going to show you exactly why these patterns work.  And the theory predates NLP by a long show.

You’ll also discover how the Lamaze Method of Childbirth affects your copy!

Seminar Update:

  1. The seminar will be held in Las Vegas on September 5, 6, & 7.
  2. Sandra is negotiating with the hotel and we should have an answer this week.
  3. This seminar is only for serious copywriters or marketers who want to have access to tools not found anywhere else.
  4. This seminar will definitely set the record for the most notes taken.  You won’t want to miss a single word.

Peace.

Harlan Kilstein

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